The Early Modern Philosophy Calendar

This website is maintained by Stephen H. Daniel at Texas A&M University as a service to scholars working in the history of early modern philosophy. It brings together information about calls for papers, event schedules, and contacts about presentations, conferences, and seminars dealing with research in late 16th, 17th, and 18th century philosophy.

To have an event listed, send the appropriate information to Steve Daniel (sdaniel@tamu.edu). Events posted on various mailing lists and websites (e.g., philosop, philos, MWSeminar, Montreal EM Roundtable, philevents) are incorporated into this page. If no deadline is listed for calls for papers, that means either that the deadline has passed or presentations were by invitation only.

Announced and Revised Events (recent postings listed first)
Upcoming Submission Deadline Dates


November 26, 2014
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:00-4:00  Tamas Demeter (Budapest): "The Flight from Mathematics in the Human Sciences: The Case of 18th-Century Scotland"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


November 28-29, 2014
Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy
Faculty of Philosophy, Splaiul Independentei 204
University of Bucharest
Bucharest, Romania
Friday, November 28
    9.00-9.30  Welcome
    9.30-10.30  John Henry (Edinburgh): "The Newtonian Moment: How Action at a Distance Became Part of Mainstream Physics (Uniquely) throughout the Long Eighteenth Century"
    10.40-11.20  Niels Martens (Oxford): "Against Comparativism about Mass"
    11.20-12.00  Ovidiu Babes (Bucharest): "The Role of Demonstration in Descartes’ Early Works"
    13.40-14.20  Andrei Nae (Bucharest): "The Therapeutic Function of Education in Bacon and Locke"
    14.20-15.00  Alexandra Bacalu (Bucharest): "Remedies Using the Imagination and the Passions in Early Modern Thought"
    15.20-16.00  Anna Ortin (Edinburgh): "Hume, the Problem of Content, and the Idea of the Identical Self"
    16.00-16.40  Julieta Vivanco Undurraga (Navarra): "Contractualism, Representation and Natural Rights in Samuel Pufendorf"
    16.50-17.50  Doina-Cristina Rusu (Bucharest): "Forms and Laws of Nature in Francis Bacon’s Natural Philosophy"
Saturday, November 29
    9.30-10.30  Arianna Borrelli (Tech U Berlin): "Notions of 'Spirit' and the Conceptualization of Experience in Early Modern Natural Philosophy"
    10.40-11.20  Maike Scherhans (Oradea): "'What does it look like?': Thomas Sydenham, John Locke and the Observational Method"
    11.20-12.00  Xinghua Wang (Tennessee, Knoxville): "Locke on Personal Identity"
    13.40-14.20  Claudia Dumitru (Bucharest): "Locke and the Artificial Language Movement"
    14.20-15.00  Toth Oliver Istvan (Central European): "The Role of Inherence in Spinoza’s Ethics"
    15.20-16.00  Filip Buyse (Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne): "Spinoza and the Laws of Parts which Adapt Themselves to the Laws or Nature of Other Parts"
    16.00-16.40  Sean Winkler (Leuven): "The Relationship between Spinoza’s Physics and his Doctrine of Conatus"
    16.50-17.30  Andrew Sackin-Poll (Warwick): "A Reappraisal of the Role the Idea Idearum Doctrine Plays in Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Mind"
Website.
Contact: Claudia Dumitru.


November 28-29, 2014
Conference: The Idea of Purposiveness in Kant and German Idealism
University of Leuven
Institute of Philosophy, Room A, Kardinaal Mercierplein 2
Leuven, Belgium
Friday, November 28
    10.10-10.15  Karin de Boer (Leuven)
    10.15-11.30  Lea Ypi (London Sch Economics): "Teleology and Systematic Unity in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason"
    11.30-12.45  Stefan Bird-Pollan (Kentucky): "Seeing the Big Picture: Kant, Practical Reason and Purposiveness"
    14.00-14.45  Henny Blomme (Paris-Sorbonne): "Three Critiques: Four Kinds of Purposiveness"
    14.45-15.30  Laura Davis (Pittsburgh): "Purposiveness and the Possibility of Generality"
    15.30-16.15  Gesa Wellmann (Leuven): "Systematicity and Teleology in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason"
    16.45-17.30  Levno Plato (Leeds): "Beauty as the Symbol of the Morally Good: Kant’s Distinction Between Formal Subjective Purposiveness and Internal Objective Purposiveness"
    17.30-18.15  Julia Peters (Tübingen): "Natural Purposiveness and Duties to Oneself in Kant’s Doctrine of Virtue"
Saturday, November 29
    9.30-10.45  Gertrudis Vandevijver (Ghent): "Teleology and Intentionality in Kant’s Critical Work"
    11.00-11.45  Michael Kurak (ind scholar, London): "Self-Organization in Kant's Critical Project"
    11.45-12.30  Filippo Ranchio (Goethe U Frankfurt am Main): "The Persistence of Life: Kant and Hegel on Natural Purposiveness and Self-Determination"
    12.30-13.15  Justus Schollmeyer (Freie U Berlin): "Is There an Adequate Conception of Function in Hegel's Chapter on Teleology in the Science of Logic?"
    14.15-15.30  Henning Tegtmeyer (Leuven): "Schelling on Teleology"
    15.30-16.15  Bart Zantvoort (Univ Coll Dublin): "The Idea Worn Away: Hegel's Notion of Teleology"
    16.45-18.00  James Kreines (Claremont McKenna): TBA
Website.
Contact: Karin de Boer.


November 28-30, 2014
Kant Festival
Keele University
Keele, UK
Friday, November 28: Main Lecture Theatre, Sustainability Hub
    9:25-9:30  Ruhi Demiray (Keele/Kocaeli): Welcome
    9:30-10:45  Sorin Baiasu (Keele/Vienna): “Kant on Law’s Complex Dependence on Ethics”; commentator Harry Lesser (Manchester)
    11:00-12:15  Stefano Bacin (Milan): “On the Development of Kant's Distinction between Ethics and Right”; commentator Alice Pinheiro Walla (Cork)
    13:30-14:45  Sari Kisilevsky (CUNY): “Legal Rules and Legal Personality: Kant and the Notion of Legal Subjects”; commentator Sofie Christine Möller (Florence)
    14:45-16:00  Thomas Mertens (Radboud): “On the unity of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals”; commentator Daniel Herbert (Sheffield)
    16:15-17:30  Ruhi Demiray (Keele/Kocaeli): "The Cul-de-Sac in the Natural Law Theory and Legal Positivism: The Question of the Normativity of Law"; commentator Joe Saunders (Sheffield)
    17:30-18:00  Closing Comments
    18:30-19:30 (Claus Moser Research Centre, Conference Room)  Howard Williams (Aberystwyth): “Interpreting Kant’s Political Philosophy”
Saturday, November 29: Claus Moser Research Centre, Conference Room
Themes from the Work of Howard Williams
    9:30-10:45  Sarah Holtman (Minnesota): "Idealization, Civic Respect and Kantian Citizenship"; commentator Garrath Williams (Lancaster)
    11:00-12:15  Reidar Maliks (Oslo): "Kant's Reflections on the Revolution in France"; commentator Antonino Falduto (Halle-Wittenberg)
    13:30-14:45  Luigi Caranti (Catania): "Kantian Peace and Liberal Peace"; commentator Katerina Deligiorgi (Sussex)
    14:45-16:00  Susan Shell (Boston College): "Kant on Citizenship, Society and Redistributive Justice"; commentator: Paola Romero (LSE)
    16:15-17:15  Howard Williams (Aberystwyth): "Kant's Political Philosophy: A Reply to My Interpreters"
Sunday, November 30: Claus Moser Research Centre, Conference Room
Official Launch of the Keele-Oxford-St Andrews Centre for Kantian Studies. Speakers:
    9:00-10:30  Edward Kanterian (Kent) & Sorin Baiasu (Keele/Vienna): "Comments on the Kant chapter from A. W. Moore's Evolution of Modern Metaphysics"; commentator Adrian Moore (Oxford)
    10:45-11:45  James Tartaglia (Keele): "Rorty's Ambivalent Relationship with Kant"; commentator Caitlin Hamblin (Edinburgh)
    11:45-12:45  Jens Timmermann (St Andrews): "The Demands of Kant's Ethics"; commentator Alix Cohen (Edinburgh)
    14:00-15:00  Giuseppina D'Oro (Keele): "The Philosopher As Jedi Knight: Collingwood's (Kant-Inspired) Idealist Metaontology"; commentator Andrew Stephenson (Oxford)
    15:00-16:00  Anil Gomes (Oxford): "Naïve Realism in Kantian Phrase"; commentator Max Edwards (UCL)
    16:15-17:15  Leslie Stevenson (St Andrews): "Kant's Sensational Philosophy"; commentator Thomas Land (Cambridge)
Website.
Contacts: Sorin Baiasu and Ruhi Demiray.


December 5, 2014
Conference: Henry More (1614-1687)
Warburg Institute
London, UK
    10.45–11.00  Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth): Introduction
    11.00–11.30  Jasper Reid (King’s College): "More's Place in Seventeenth-Century Thought"
    11.30-12.00  Guido Giglioni (Warburg Inst): "Henry More’s Psychozoia and the Epic of Emanation"
    12.00-12.30  Douglas Hedley (Cambridge): "Henry More and Nathaniel Ingelo: The Platonic Imagination in Cambridge?"
    1.30-2:20  Cecilia Muratori (Warwick): "Henry More on Animals"
    2.20-3.15  Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth): "Henry More and Renaissance Philosophy: More's Response to Girolamo Cardano in his Of the Immortality of the Soul"
    3.45–4.40  David Leech (Bristol): "Henry More on the ‘Boniform Faculty’"
    4.40-5.30  Alan Gabbey (Barnard C, Columbia U): "Philosophia Spinozana Destructa: Henry More (1671-1679)"
The British Society for the History of Philosophy has kindly agreed to support the provision of a number of bursaries for full-time students (covering travel expenses and the conference fee) to enable them to attend the conference. If you would like to apply for a bursary please email Sarah Hutton as soon as possible giving details of the department/institution where you are registered, and the title of your PhD topic (if you are a PhD student).
Website.
Contacts: Sarah Hutton or Guido Giglioni.


December 5, 2014
Princeton Philosophy Department Colloquium
Speaker: Michael Della Rocca (Yale)
Time: 4:00-6:00
Princeton, NJ
Website.


December 5, 2014
Montréal Early Modern Philosophy Round Table Colloquium
Université du Québec à Montréal W-5215
455, boul. René-Lévesque Est
Montréal, QC
Time: 15h00-17h00
Speaker: Antonia LoLordo (Virginia): "Jonathan Edwards’ Arguments for Immaterialism"
Website.
Contacts: Julie Walsh and Dario Perinetti.


December 6, 2014
Conference: Hume and Montesquieu: Methods, Moeurs and Republican Monarchy
Yale University
Luce Hall, Room 202
New Haven, CT
    9:30-9:45  Andrew Sabl (Yale): Opening Remarks
    9:45-10:15  Michael Mosher (Tulsa): "Political Time in Hume and Montesquieu"
    10:15-10:45  Frederick Whelan (Pittsburgh): "Thoughts on Hume’s Social Science (and Montesquieu’s)"
    10:45-11:15  Isaac Nakhimovsky (Yale): Commentator
    11:15-11:45  Discussion
    1:00-1:30  Andrew Sabl (Yale): "Gallant Monarchies and Chaste Republics: Hume on Mores and Regime Types"
    1:30-2:00  Diana Schaub (Loyola, Maryland): "Montesquieu’s Legislator: Reforming Mores by Reordering the Laws"
    2:00-2:30  Dennis Rasmussen (Tufts): Commentator
    2:30-3:00  Discussion
    3:15-3:45  Annelien de Dijn (Amsterdam): "Montesquieu as an Anti-Republican"
    3:45-4:15  Marc Hanvelt (Carleton): "Opinions on Monarchy: Hume on Machiavelli’s ‘Extremely Defective‘ Reasonings"
    4:15-4:45  Eric MacGilvray (Ohio St): Commentator
    4:45-5:15  Discussion
Website.
Contacts: Adom Getachew & Anurag Sinha.


December 10, 2014
Colloquium: Anthropology, Atheism, and Common Notions
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44, 2:00-5:30 p.m.
Ghent, Belgium
    •  Alison Peterman (Rochester): "Spinoza on the Common Notions"
    •  Anik Waldow (Sydney): "How To Study the Human Being? Kant on Natural History and Anthropology"
    •  Esther Kroeker (Antwerp): "Reid's response to Hume's moral atheism"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


December 10, 2014
Society for Early Modern Philosophy at Yale Lecture
Yale University
Location: Linsly-Chittenden Hall 105
New Haven, CT
Speaker: Kenneth Winkler (Yale): "The Scope of Sensitive Knowledge"; comments Matthew Leisinger (Yale)
Time: 4:00-6:00 pm
Website.
Contacts: Matthew Leisinger and Julia Borcherding.


December 11, 2014
Séminaire sur les Pays-Bas au XVIIe siècle
ENS de Lyon
15 Parvis René Descartes (métro: Debourg)
Lyon, France
Time and location: TBA
Intervenants: Delphine Antoine-Mahut (ENS Lyon) et Catherine Secretan (ENS Lyon): "L'éloge de l'homme ordinaire"
Contact: Catherine Secretan.


December 11, 2014
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Laurent Bove: "Camus: une expérimentation vitale de l’immanence. L’Étranger au risque du spinozisme"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


December 11, 2014
Montréal Early Modern Philosophy Round Table Colloquium
Université de Montréal
2910 Édouard-Montpetit, #422
Montréal, QC
18h00-20h00
Mitia Rioux-Beaulne (Ottawa): "De l’usage de l’histoire des sciences: remarques sur l’Histoire de l’Académie Royale des Sciences de Fontenelle (1700-1740)"
Website.
Contacts: Daniel Dumouchel and Christian Leduc.


December 11-12, 2014
Kant Konferenz: Der "innere Gerichtshof" der Vernunft: Normativität, Rationalität und Gewissen im Deutschen Idealismus
Tilburg University
Academia Building, Raum AZ 201
Tilburg, The Netherlands
Donnerstag, 11 Dezember
    09:30-10:00  Paul Cobben (Tilburg): Öffnung
    10:00-11:00  Klaus Düsing (Köln): "Selbstbestimmung der Person und sittliche Gemeinschaft als Grundlagen der Ethik"
    11:00-11:30  Saša Josifović (Köln): "Praktische Normativität im Deutschen Idealismus"
    12:00-13:00  Stefan Bird-Pollan (Kentucky): "Seeing the Big Picture: Kant, Practical Reason and Purposiveness"
    14:00-15:00  Thomas Oehl (LMU München): "Das Verhältnis von Erkennen und Wollen im Gerichtshof der Vernunft"
    15:00-16:00  Paul Cobben (Tilburg): "Hegels Begriff des Gewissens als Explikation des kategorischen Imperativs"
    16:30-17:30  Christian Krijnen (Vrije U Amsterdam): "Freiheit als Einheit der Vernunft. Zu Hegels begriffslogischer Lösung eines Kantischen Problems"
    17:30-18:30  Jean-Christophe Merle (Vechta): TBA
Freitag, 12 Dezember
    09:30-10:30  Heiner Klemme (MLU Halle-Wittenberg): "Die Idee und das Recht der Freiheit. Über den Zusammenhang von Freiheit und Verbindlichkeit bei Kant"
    10:30-11:30  Arthur Kok (Tilburg): "Der Mensch als Endzweck der Schöpfung. Die Einheit von Moralität und Glückseligkeit jenseits des Gewissens"
    12:00-13:00  Kurt Appel (Wien): "Von der Moralität zur Freiheit. Hegels eigentliche Kantkritik"
    14:00-15:00  Dieter Schönecker (Siegen): "Kants Modell des Gewissens in der Religionsschrift"
    15:00-16:00  Elke Schmidt (Siegen): "Kant über Gott als den Anderen im Gewissen"
    16:30-17:30  Diskussion
Website.
Kontakt: Arthur Kok.


December 12-13, 2014
Embodiment Conference
Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7
Amphitéâtre Pierre-Gilles de Gennes
Bâtiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante
Paris, France
Vendredi, 12 décembre / Friday, December 12
    09:30-10:00  Justin E. H. Smith (Paris Diderot): Mot de bienvenue / Opening remarks
    10:00-11:15  Brooke Holmes (Princeton): "The Body of Western Embodiment: Classical Antiquity and the Early History of a Problem"
    11:15-12:30  Rafael Nájera (Brown): "God, Angels, and Humans: Scholastic Philosophers on the Role of the Body in Knowledge"
    13:30-14:45  Ohad Nachtomy (Bar Ilan): "Embodiment, Nestedness, and Individuality in Leibniz’s view of Living Beings"
    14:45-16:00  Geoffrey Gorham (Macalester Coll): "'God Embodied': Hobbes’s Corporeal Deity"
    16:15-17:15  Discussion of the "Reflections" Section in the Oxford Philosophical Concepts Series
Samedi, 13 décembre / Saturday, December 13
    09:30-10:45  Alison Peterman (Rochester): "Spinoza on Feeling Embodied"
    10:45-12:00  Lesley-Anne Dyer (Baylor): "Paradoxes of Embodiment in the Platonist and Christian Traditions"
    12:00-13:15  Sarah Byers (Boston Coll): "Philosophical Puzzles about Embodiment: Life, Death, Flesh, Body and Soul in Augustine"
    14:30-15:45  Philippe Huneman (IHPST Paris) & Charles T. Wolfe (Ghent): "Man-Machines and Embodiment from La Mettrie to Bernard"
    15:45-17:00  Helen Lang (Villanova): "Embodied or Ensouled? Aristotle on the Relation of Soul and Body"
    17:15-18:15  Planning meeting for the Oxford Philosophical Concepts volume
Website.
Contact: Justin Smith.


December 13, 2014
Séminaire Descartes
ENS Ulm
Paris
Time: 9 h 30
Topic: "L’âge classique de Jean-Claude Pariente"
Contact: Denis Kambouchner.


December 27-30, 2014
APA Eastern Division Meeting
Marriott Philadelphia Downtown
1201 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA
Sunday, December 28
    9:00-11:00  International Berkeley Society (chair: Nancy Kendrick, Wheaton C, MA)
        Stephen H. Daniel (Texas A&M): "Berkeley and Descartes on How Perception Is Active"; commentator Tom Lennon (Western Ontario)
        Geoffrey Gorham (Macalester C.): "Locke and Berkeley on Time and Succession"; commentator Martha Bolton (Rutgers)
    11:15-1:15  Leibniz Society of North America (chair: Martha Brandt Bolton, Rutgers)
        Daniel Garber (Princeton): "Monads on My Mind"; commentator: Edward Glowienka (Carroll C)
    2:00-5:00  Symposium: The Reception of Descartes's Philosophy (chair: Kristin Primus, NYU)
        Thomas Lennon (Western Ontario)
        Lawrence Nolan (Cal State, Long Beach)
        Tad Schmaltz (Michigan)
    2:00-5:00  International Hobbes Association I (chair: Michael P. Krom, Saint Vincent C)
        Emre Keskin (William Paterson): "Hobbes's Optics"
        Steve Viner (Middlebury C): "'Obligation' in Leviathan: Can Sovereigns Be Fooles?"
        Joseph Anderson (South Florida): "Liberty, Definitions, and Piety: Leibniz's Critique of Hobbes on Necessity"
        Shane D. Courtland (Minnesota, Duluth): "Hobbesian Absolutism, Thinly Interpreted, Fits the U.S."
        Carlo Burelli (U Studi Milano): "Subjectivity Is Objective: Thomas Hobbes on Normative Truth"
        Justin R. Hawkins (Yale Div): "The Theology of Calvin and Hobbes: A Theological Critique of A. P. Martinich's The Two Gods of Leviathan"
    5:15-7:15  Hume Society (chair: Lewis Powell, SUNY Buffalo)
      Topic: Hume on Religion
        Deborah Boyle (C of Charleston): "Hume on Natural Beliefs and Belief in God"
        Emily Kelahan (Illinois Wesleyan): "The Design Argument in Hume's Natural History of Religion"
    5:15-7:15  Descartes Society I
      Topic: Cartesianism and 17th-Century Women Philosophers
        Alice Sowaal (San Francisco St): "Descartes and Astell on Generosity"
        Christia Mercer (Columbia): "Conway and Cartesianism"
          Commentator: Karen Detlefsen (Penn)
    7:30-10:30  North American Kant Society (chair: Pablo Muchnik, Emerson C)
      Topic: Jennifer Mensch's Kant's Organicism: Epigeneis and the Development of Critical Philosophy
        Guenter Zoeller (Munich): "Metaphor or Method? Jennifer Mensch's Organic Kant Interpretation"
        John Zammito (Rice): "Bringing Biology Back In"
        Jennifer Mensch (Waterloo): "Genealogy and Critique in Kant's Organic History of Reason"
    7:30-10:30  Society for the History of Political Philosophy (chair: Patrick Goodin, Howard U)
        9:05-9:45  Andrew Romiti (Catholic U): "Jacob Klein on the Cartesian Revolution"
        9:50-10:30  Paul Wilford (Freie U Berlin): "Autonomy as the Telos of Kant's Rational Religion"
Monday, December 29
    9:00-11:00  Symposium: Spinoza (chair: Julie Klein, Villanova)
        John Grey (Michigan State): "Necessitarianism and Divine Self-Causation in Spinoza"
          Commentator: Alison Peterman (Rochester)
    1:30-4:30  Spinoza (chair: Jason Aleksander, Saint Xavier)
        Michael Della Rocca (Yale)
        John Carriero (UCLA)
          Commentator: Eugene Marshall (Florida International)
    1:30-4:30  History of Ethics (chair: Michael Byron, Kent State)
        Ryan Pollock (Penn State: "The Generosity and Capacity of Our Nature: Hume's Reply to Hutcheson in the Treatise"; commentator: Stephanie Semler (Northern Virginia Comm C)
        Victor Saenz (Rice): "Prudence and Morality in Cicero's De Officiis III.21"; commentator: Michael Wiitala (North Carolina)
        Torsten Menge (Georgetown): "Hobbes and the Fiction of Sovereign Power"; commentator: Emily Crookston (Coastal Carolina)
    1:30-4:30  Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant Lecture (chair: Eric Watkins, UC San Diego)
        Karl Ameriks (Notre Dame): "How 'Autonomous' Is the Formula of Autonomy Itself?"
    1:30-4:30  North American Kant Society (chair: Lara Ostaric, Temple)
      Topic: Kant on Education
        Chris Surprenant (New Orleans): "Kant's Moral Education and the Cultivation of Virtue"
        Alix Cohen (Edinburgh): "The Role of Feelings in Moral Education"
        Robert Louden (Southern Maine): "'Total Transformation': Educational Reform in Basedow and Kant"
    7:00-10:00  Descartes Society II (chair: Julie Klein, Villanova)
        Alan Nelson (North Carolina, Chapel Hill) & Kurt Smith (Bloomsburg U PA): "Synthesizing Descartes on Analysis"; commentator: Roger Florka (Ursinus C)
        Andrew Platt (Stony Brook): "Defending a 'Compatibilist' Reading of Descartes on the Will"; commentator: Colin Chamberlain (Temple)
    7:00-10:00  International Hobbes Association II (chair: Aloysius Martinich, Texas-Austin)
        Stephen Bero (Southern California): "Against the Universality of Hobbes's Laws of Nature"
        Michael Byron (Kent State): "Submission and Subjection in Leviathan"
        Kody W. Cooper (Princeton): "The Essence of Leviathan: The Person of the Commonwealth and the Common Good"
        Luciano Venezia (U Nac Quilmes): "What Difference Does the Sovereign Make?"
        Signy Gutnick Allen (Queen Mary, U London): "'Author of His Own Punishment': The Hobbesian Citizenship of Punished Individuals"
        Jauffrey Berthier (Bordeaux Montaigne): "Hobbes and Penal Governance: Punishment as Civil and Political Hostility"
Tuesday, December 30
    11:15-1:15  Kant (chair: Georges Dicker, SUNY Brockport)
        Michael Bennett McNulty (UC Irvine): "Chemistry in Kant's Opus postumum"; commentator: Katherine Dunlop (Texas, Austin)
        Justin Shaddock (Williams C): "Kant's Neglected Alternative and the Unavoidable Need for the Transcendental Deduction"; commentator: Krasimira Filcheva (North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
    1:30-4:30  Substantial Unity: Conway, Locke, and Leibniz (chair: Edwin McCann, Southern California)
        Martha Brandt Bolton (Rutgers)
        Matthew Priselac (Oklahoma)
        Christia Mercer (Columbia)
Website.


January 7, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:15-4:00  Marlise Rijks (Ghent): "Crocodiles, Herbs, and Shells: Apothecaries and the Trade in Collectables in Seventeenth-Century Antwerp"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


January 9-10, 2015
Spinoza-Leibniz Workshop
Michigan State University
MSU Philosophy Dept Seminar Room, 530 South Kedzie Bldg., 368 Farm Lane
East Lansing, MI
Friday, January 9
    1:00-2:30  Charles Joshua Horn (Wisconsin, Stevens Point): "The Ontological Interpretation of Compossibility"
    2:30-4:00  Julia Jorati (Ohio State): "Leibnizian Contingency and the Precipice of Spinozism"
    4:15-5:45  Stephen Zylstra (Toronto): "Spinoza on Action and Immanent Causation"
    5:45-7:15  Samuel Murray (Saint Louis U): "Leibniz on Divine Inclination"
Saturday, January 10
    9:00-10:30  John Brandau (Johns Hopkins): "Spinoza’s Theory of Definition"
    10:30-12:00  Edwin Curley (Michigan): "The Metaphysics of Modality in Spinoza"
    1:30-3:00  Samuel Newlands (Notre Dame): "Spinoza, Leibniz, and the Metaphysics of Perfection"
    3:00-4:30  Jeffrey McDonough (Harvard): "Leibniz, Spinoza, and an Alleged Dilemma for Rationalists"
Website.
Contact: John Grey.


January 15, 2015
Séminaire sur les Pays-Bas au XVIIe siècle
ENS de Lyon
15 Parvis René Descartes (métro: Debourg)
Lyon, France
Time and location: TBA
Intervenant: Anton van der Lem (Leyde): "La Révolte des Pays-Bas (1568-1648): approches historiographiques récentes et présentation du cours de Johan Huizinga (Paris, 1930)"
Contact: Catherine Secretan.


January 21, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:00-4:00  Paola Rumore (Turin): "From theology to philosophy: the immortality of the soul in early German enlightenment"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


January 22, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: André Tosel: "Comment aborder la question des rapports entre la pensée de Spinoza et cella de Marx?"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


January 23, 2015
Séminaire Descartes
ENS de Lyon
Lyon, France
Time: TBA
Speaker: Antony McKenna, autour de la Correspondance de P. Bayle
Contact: Denis Kambouchner.


January 30, 2015
Royal Institute of Philosophy London Lecture Series
Dr Williams’s Library, lecture hall, 14 Gordon Square
London, UK
Speaker: Peter Kail (Oxford): "Hume's 'Manifest Contradictions'"
Time: 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Website.
Contact: James Garvey.


February 18, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:00-4:00  Justin Smith (Paris VII): "Kant and Mill on the 'Logic' of Racial Divisions"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


February 18-21, 2015
APA Central Division Meeting
Hilton St. Louis at The Ballpark
1 South Broadway
St. Louis, MO
Program submission deadline: June 1, 2014
Thursday, February 19
    5:30-7:30  North American Spinoza Society
      Author Meets Critics, Eugene J. Marshall's The Spiritual Automaton
        Discussant: Keith Green (East Tennessee)
        Discussant: Ericka Tucker (Marquette)
        Response: Eugene Marshall (Florida International)
    5:30-7:30  North American Kant Society (chair: Anne Margaret Baxley, Washington U, St. Louis)
      Topic: Kant's Cosmopolitanism
        Loren Goldman (Ohio U): "Kantian Prophecy, Armed and Unarmed"
        Timothy Waligore (Pace): "Kant’s Cosmopolitan Right Reconsidered"
Website.


February 20, 2015
Royal Institute of Philosophy London Lecture Series
Dr Williams’s Library, lecture hall, 14 Gordon Square
London, UK
Speaker: Catherine Wilson (York): "Managing Expectations: The 'Limits' Theme in Locke"
Time: 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Website.
Contact: James Garvey.


February 23-24, 2015
Dutch Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy
Radboud University
Nijmegen, Netherlands
Invited speakers: Pauline Phemister (Edinburgh) and Wiep van Bunge (Erasmus, Rotterdam)
This Seminar aims to bring together advanced students and scholars working on early modern philosophy (broadly conceived, ranging from the later scholastics to Kant). Like kindred workshops, the intention is to stimulate scholarly exchange and collaboration in this area. Please send the abstract of your proposed lecture (on any topic relevant to early modern philosophy) to Andrea Sangiacomo by November 1. The abstract must be no longer than 500 words, anonymized for the sake of blind reviewing and sent as a .docx file. The author’s name and contact information (name, affiliation, email and professional status – doctoral student; postdoc; lecturer; etc.) should also be specified in your e-mail message. Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and you will be notified of the review’s outcome by December 30. We will do our best to send the reviewers report to all participants in order to provide in any case a hopefully useful feedback on their abstract. The language of presentations and discussions is English. There are no fees for registration. Attendance is free and all listeners welcome. However, no financial help can be provided to support travel expenses and accommodation.
Website.
Contacts: Christoph Lüthy and Andrea Sangiacomo.


February 25, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:15-4:00  Olivier Surel (Paris X): "Immanent Critique in Spinoza's Theory of Affects"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


February 26, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Pierre-François Moreau: "Qu’est-ce qu’une révélation?"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


February 27, 2015
Royal Institute of Philosophy London Lecture Series
Dr Williams’s Library, lecture hall, 14 Gordon Square
London, UK
Speaker: Sarah Patterson (Birkbeck U London): "Descartes on Errors of the Senses"
Time: 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Website.
Contact: James Garvey.


March 6, 2015
Royal Institute of Philosophy London Lecture Series
Dr Williams’s Library, lecture hall, 14 Gordon Square
London, UK
Speaker: Sebastian Gardner (U College London): "Kant's Third Critique"
Time: 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Website.
Contact: James Garvey.


March 7, 2015
Séminaire Descartes
ENS Ulm
Paris
Time: TBA
Topic: "Relire les Écrits sur la grâce"
Contact: Denis Kambouchner.


March 7-8, 2015
New York City Workshop in Early Modern Philosophy
Fordham University, Lincoln Center Campus
60th St. and Columbus Ave.
New York, NY
Invited speakers: Alan Gabbey (Columbia/Barnard), Jonathan Israel (Inst Advanced Study), Béatrice Longunesse (NYU)
The aim of this workshop is to foster exchange and collaboration among scholars, students, and anyone with an interest in Early Modern Philosophy. We welcome presentations of current research on any topic in early modern philosophy (roughly covering the period 1600-1800). Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words prepared for blind review to nycearlymodern@gmail.com no later than November 30th, 2014.
Website.
Contacts: Ohad Nachtomy and Reed Winegar.


March 13-15, 2015
Conference: Common Sense and Enlightenment
Center of the Study of Scottish Philosophy
Princeton Theological Seminary
Princeton, NJ
A long term project of the CSSP comes to fruition in 2015 when the first two volumes of a multi-authored History of Scottish Philosophy will be published by Oxford University Press. Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century, Volume One, edited by James Harris (St Andrews) and Aaron Garrett (Boston U) covers Scottish Enlightenment writers and topics in morality, politics, aesthetics and religion. Scottish Philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries, edited by Gordon Graham, engages with the post-Enlightenment debates between once famous, but now much less well known, Scottish philosophers (e.g., Thomas Brown, William Hamilton, J F Ferrier, Alexander Bain, John Macmurray), with chapters on more wide ranging topics such as the Scottish reception of Kant and Hegel, the rise of Idealism, and the influence of Scottish philosophy abroad.
    The CSSP Spring Conference 2015 will celebrate the appearance of these two volumes. Plenary sessions will take the form of “Author meets Critics”, and two panels are planned. Paper proposals for concurrent sessions are welcome. They may be on any topic falling within the general conference theme of "Common Sense and Enlightenment." Papers on Scottish philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries are especially welcome. Abstracts of not more than 300 words should be sent to CSSP by November 14, 2014. Those making submissions will be notified by mid-December 2015. Graduate students are eligible to compete for the George Elder Davie Prize which covers the cost of presenting at the conference and secures publication in the Journal of Scottish Philosophy (subject to blind review).
Friday, March 13
    10:00-12:00  Panel: "Scottish Philosophy before the Enlightenment": Christian Maurer (Fribourg), Colin Heydt (South Florida), Giovanni Gellera (Glasgow), Dan Garber (Princeton)
    1:30-3:00  Concurrent Sessions I
    3:15-4:45  Don Garrett (NYU): "Hume's Philosophical Ambitions: Aims and Outcomes"
Saturday, March 14
    9:00-10:30  Concurrent Sessions II
    11:00-12:00  Symposium: The Scottish Reception of Kant: Paul Guyer (Brown), Des Hogan (Princeton)
    1:30-3:00  Concurrent Sessions III
    3:30-4:30  Symposium: Common Sense and Pragmatism: Peter Baumann (Swarthmore), Douglas McDermid (Trent, Ontario)
Sunday, March 15
    9:00-10:30  Symposium: Adam Smith: Remy Debes (Memphis), Fonna Forman (UC San Diego)
    10:45-12:00  Concurrent Sessions IV
    1:15-2:45  Panel: "The Idea of a Scottish Philosophical tradition": Gordon Graham (Princeton Seminary), James Harris (St Andrews), Aaron Garrett (Boston)
Website.
Contact: cssp@ptsem.edu.


March 14-15, 2015
Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy
Mansfield College, University of Oxford
Oxford, UK
Invited Speakers: Susan James (Birkbeck), Catherine Wilson (York)
Abstracts for papers on any topic in early modern philosophy (roughly, the period from Bacon to Kant) are welcomed. Please send an abstract of approx. 2 sides double-spaced for a reading/presentation time of approx. 40 mins. Submissions should include name and contact details on a cover sheet only. Please email submissions or other enquiries to Paul Lodge no later than Jan 1, 2015.
Contact: Paul Lodge.


March 19-20, 2015
Conference: The Marginalization of Astrology
University of Utrecht
Utrecht, The Netherlands
The Descartes Centrum for history of science of the University of Utrecht, in collaboaration with the department of philosophy of the Radboud University at Nijmegen, will host an international conference on the problem of the marginalization of astrology in the early modern period.
    Astrology has been a well-established and respected part of scholarship for centuries, practiced in many cultural and geographical settings. However, in the modern world, astrology, though still very much present, has lost its scientific status and is relegated to the fringes of serious learning. In the history of the sciences, this must be regarded as a momentous shift. The definite step in the “marginalization” of astrology appears to have been taken in the seventeenth century and should therefore be regarded as an important element (rather than as a consequence) of the so-called Scientific Revolution.
    The reasons for this development are far from clear. Actually, even the development itself (when, where and by whom did astrology become disavowed) has so far been only poorly documented. The conference therefore aims at bringing together specialists from various fields to throw light on this intruiging question. It is the aim of the conference to study the subject from various different angles:

People who are interested to give a paper at this conference are invited to send a title and abstract (300 words maximum) by September 30 to the organizers listed below as contacts.
Website.
Contacts: Rienk Vermij and Hiro Hirai.


March 26-28, 2015
Panel: Pain and Philosophy in the Early Modern Period
Renaissance Society of America Conference
Humboldt University
Berlin, Germany
A panel sponsored by Epistémè (Research Group on Early Modern England, Paris) during the RSA 2015 conference. The aim of this panel is to explore the links between physical pain and philosophical theories in the early modern period. Two main issues will be addressed in this session:
    •  the medical and philosophical theories that were elaborated to account for physical pain at the time: what could be the cause of physical pain and how could it be explained physiologically? Was there a clear distinction between physical pain and emotional suffering? Was pain gendered? We will also focus on the value of pain: was it always seen as negative or could it also be good?
    •  the value of suffering might also lead us to wonder about the role of pain in the elaboration of one’s philosophical thought: to what extent could the personal experience of pain have an influence on the subjects an author chose to deal with or on their philosophical thought? Although it might be explicitly stated in philosophical works, the influence of pain on the philosophy of an author is more often found in correspondences and diaries. Intense or chronic physical pain could give an author a particular perception of life and things, or it could lead to the adoption or elaboration of a philosophy that gave hope and made pain more bearable.
Send proposals (150-word abstract and a title) as well as a one-page CV and a list of keywords to Sandrine Parageau and Yan Brailowsky by June 8, 2014.
Website.


March 27, 2015
Colloque: Conceptions et usages de l'attention au XVIIe siècle
University of Liège
Place du XX août
Liège, Belgium
Conférenciers invités: Gary Hatfield (Pennsylvania), Vili Lähteenmäki (Jyväskylä)
Les départements de philosophie de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) et de l’Université de Liège (ULg) organisent conjointement un colloque intitulé "Conceptions et usages de l’attention au xviie siècle" qui se déroulera le 27 mars 2015 à l’Université de Liège. Cet appel à contributions est destiné à compléter le programme de la journée (1 ou 2 communications seront retenues) qui fera ensuite l’objet d’une publication en langue française. Les propositions de communication ne devront pas dépasser 500 mots et devront être adressées sous la forme d’un fichier pdf anonyme, au plus tard le 1er décembre 2014 à Olivier Dubouclez et Arnauld Pelletier. Elles feront l’objet d’une évaluation à l’aveugle. Une réponse sera donnée avant le 15 janvier 2015. Il est à noter qu’aucune aide financière ne pourra être apportée par l’organisation du colloque pour les frais de voyage et d’hôtel des participants.
    Présentation: Le concept d’attention a fait l’objet de nombreux travaux ces dernières années dans le champ de la philosophie médiévale et renaissante qui ont permis de montrer comment ce thème, traditionnellement référé à Augustin et à l’augustinisme, nourrissait des théories de la perception et de la connaissance en rupture avec le paradigme aristotélicien. L’objet de notre colloque n’est pas seulement d’étudier les héritages et les prolongements de ce mouvement augustinien, mais de comprendre plus généralement comment les penseurs du XVIIe siècle (Descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche, Leibniz mais aussi Hobbes et la philosophe anglaise) ont eux même usé de l’attention et, le cas échéant, théorisé sa nature et sa fonction dans le cadre des conceptions nouvelles de la science et de la subjectivité. Si l’attention est un concept central pour penser le sujet, c’est précisément parce qu’elle se situe à l’articulation de ce qui, dans le rapport de l’homme au monde, relève de la passivité du sentir (ou plus généralement de la réception d’un donné) et de l’activité d’un choix, sélectif ou abstrayant, analytique ou synthétique.
    La situation cartésienne du concept d’attention, à cet égard, est particulièrement frappante: constamment mobilisé des Règles pour la direction de l’esprit jusqu’aux Principes de la philosophie, avant de devenir un véritable impératif de la raison théorique chez les cartésiens ("L’attention est la seule chose que je vous demande," dit Théodore à Ariste dans les Entretiens sur la métaphysique), il n’est jamais pris pour thème explicite par Descartes lui-même. Décisif dans la conduite même des opérations intellectuelles (ainsi dans la méditation métaphysique), l’attention est pourtant reléguée à l’arrière-plan de la doctrine au profit des concepts d’évidence, d’intuition, de clarté ou de distinction. Cette situation mériterait à elle seule qu’on en identifie les raisons (pourquoi l’appel à l’attention est-il constant et dans le même temps refoulé? Qu’est-ce qui légitime et rend nécessaire cet appel? Dans quelles circonstances l’attention se constitue-t-elle en objet pour le philosophe?), et surtout pousse à s’interroger sur la "préconception" de l’attention qui en gouverne les usages, sur les sous-entendus et les référents qui la soutiennent (en particulier du côté de l’optique et des sciences de la nature). Car c’est bien le statut épistémologique du concept d’attention qui fait problème: l’attention fait-elle partie des structures mêmes de la connaissance ou est-elle un élément distinct de ces structures, intéressant plutôt les modalités de leur mise en œuvre, c’est-à-dire du savoir en tant qu’il est un acte?
    Ce problème est d’autant plus crucial que deux visions sensiblement différentes du savoir s’articulent à l’Âge classique autour du paradigme de l’attention: l’une qui le fait dépendre de la présence à soi de l’esprit, conscient des opérations qu’il exécute et volontaire dans ce qu’il entreprend, et l’autre qui au contraire vise à le dispenser de cet effort pour que la connaissance se réduise à l’enchaînement le plus simple et le plus aisé dont le calcul algébrique constitue le meilleur exemple (puisque l’attention s’y trouve soulagée par l’écriture et la brièveté des signes). Dès lors apparaît une ambiguïté dans le traitement que le XVIIe siècle a réservé à l’attention, permettant peut-être de dépasser l’opposition trop tranchée entre "intuitionnisme" et "formalisme" pour prendre acte de la présence chez les philosophes d’une attitude ambivalente par rapport aux usages d’une attention qu’il s’agit tantôt d’amplifier, tantôt de réduire (mais alors doit-on la tenir pour une réalité quantifiable?), tantôt de valoriser comme une activité positive de l’esprit, tantôt de dénoncer comme une manifestation de notre finitude contribuant à rendre incertain et contingent l’accès au savoir.
    Il conviendra pour traiter de ces problèmes d’embrasser dans toute son ampleur le langage de l’attention, de l’attentio, de la diligentia et de l’animadversio, mais aussi du lexique négatif de la distraction, de la négligence ou de l’oubli, tel qu’il s’étend aussi à l’Âge classique dans les domaines de la morale et de la théologie.
Website.
Contacts: Arnauld Pelletier et Olivier Dubouclez.


March 28, 2015
Séminaire Descartes
ENS Ulm
Paris
Time: TBA
Speaker: Susan James (Birkbeck, London): "Nouvelles recherches sur le Traité Théologico-Politique"
Contact: Denis Kambouchner.


April 1-5, 2015
APA Pacific Division Meeting
The Westin Bayshore, Vancouver
1601 Bayshore Drive
Vancouver, BC
Wednesday, April 1
    9:00-11:00  
Thursday, April 2
    9:00-11:00  
Friday, April 3
    9:00-11:00  
    7:00-10:00 p.m.  Descartes Society: "'Confusion Confounded'? Descartes on Material Falsity"; discussants Roger Florka (Ursinus),Deborah J. Brown (Queensland), Raffaella De Rosa (Rutgers, Newark), Amy Schmitter (Alberta), Stephen I. Wagner (C St Benedict/St John’s U)
Saturday, April 4
    9:00-11:00  
Sunday, April 5
    9:00-11:00  

Date and Time Still to be Determined:
      Society for Modern Philosophy session: "Reconsidering the Modern Canon"
          Lisa Shapiro (Simon Fraser University)
          Justin E.H. Smith (Paris Diderot VII)
Website.


April 7-9, 2015
Conference: Rethinking Intellectual History
University of Sydney
New Law Building, Eastern Avenue,Camperdown Campus
Sydney, Australia
Invited speakers include:
    •  Malcolm Bull (Oxford): TBA
    •  Michael Hunter (Birkbeck, London): "The Enlightenment Rejection of Magic: Sceptics and Their Milieux in Eighteenth-Century England"
    •  Joanna Picciotto (California, Berkeley): TBA
The conference theme focuses on ten topic areas with the aim of stimulating discussion across disciplines about the past and future of intellectual history:
    •  History of Economic Thought
    •  Women and Intellectual History
    •  Biography, Autobiography and the Individual Life
    •  History (or Historiography) of Intellectual History and/or the History of Ideas
    •  Visual Ideas and the History of Art
    •  'Ancient' and 'Modern' Debates
    •  The Project and Process of Enlightenment
    •  History of Science and Intellectual History
    •  History of Political Thought
    •  History of Legal Thought
In addition to sessions devoted to the specific conference themes, there will also be a general section, covering any aspect of intellectual history. The organisers welcome abstracts of individual papers as well as proposals for sessions of 3 papers. Abstracts of the proposed papers and proposals for sessions should be sent no later than 30 November 2014 to the conference committee at sihn.rih@sydney.edu.au.
Website.
Contacts: Stephen Gaukroger, Jennifer Milam, and Glenda Sluga.


April 9, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Pascale Gillot: "Spinoza, Marx, Althusser: pour une théorie matérialiste de l’idéologie"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


April 9-11, 2015
Conference: British Society for the History of Philosophy
York, UK
Call for Papers: the British Society for the History of Philosophy invites scholars to submit symposium and individual paper proposals for its 2015 conference. Symposia and individual papers are invited on any topic and any period of the history of philosophy. Keynote speakers include Gail Fine (Cornell and Oxford), Michael Forster (Chicago/Bonn), and Susan James (Birkbeck, London).
    Proposal submission deadline is 1 June 2014, with a decision by 31 July 2014. Proposals for either symposia (3-4 thematically related presentations) or individual presentations (approximately 25-30 minutes) are welcome. Symposium submissions are especially encouraged. Submissions should be sent as an email attachment (in Word) to Arts-BSHP2015@open.ac.uk. Proposals for symposia should include:
    •  title of symposium
    •  symposium summary statement (maximum 500 words)
    •  titles and abstracts of papers (maximum 500 words for each paper)
    •  address of each participant, including e-mail, phone, and institution
    •  name and email of symposium organizer, who will serve as contact person
Proposals for papers should include:
    •  name and address and email of the participant
    •  title and abstract of the paper (maximum 500 words)
Website.
Contact: Cristina Chimisso.


April 10, 2015
Princeton Philosophy Department Colloquium
Speaker: Don Garrett (NYU)
Time: 4:00-6:00
Princeton, NJ
Website.


April 16, 2015
Séminaire sur les Pays-Bas au XVIIe siècle
INHA, 2 rue Vivienne
Paris, France
Time and room: TBA
Intervenant: Henk van Nierop (Amsterdam): "Romeyn de Hooghe"
Contact: Catherine Secretan.


April 22, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:15-4:00  Delphine Bellis (Nijmegen/MPIWG): "Gassendi's probabilism and Academic skepticism from day to day"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


April 23, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Pina Totaro: "Études récentes sur les oeuvres posthumes de Spinoza"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


April 24-25, 2015
Meeting: Eastern Study Group of the North American Kant Society
Georgetown University
Washington, DC
Invited speakers: Henry Allison (UCSD/Boston U) and Tamar Shapiro (Stanford)
Submissions for the program are welcome on all topics of Kantian scholarship (contemporary or historically oriented), including discussions of Kant's immediate predecessors and successors. Papers should be prepared for blind review and limited to 5,000 words, including footnotes and references (longer submissions will not be considered). Papers should be submitted in PDF format no later than Thursday, January 15, 2015 to Oliver Thorndike. Please include an abstract of a maximum of 300 words and a word count at the end of the paper. Abstracts without the accompanying submission will not be considered. When pertinent, please indicate whether you are a graduate student in the body of the text. Contact information should be sent in a separate Word file. Reading time is limited to 30 minutes. The best graduate student paper will receive a $200 stipend and be eligible for the Markus Herz Prize. Women, minorities, and graduate students are encouraged to submit. Papers already read at other NAKS study groups or meetings may not be submitted. Presenters must be members of NAKS in good standing. Selected papers are eligible to be considered for inclusion in the book series Rethinking Kant, published by Cambridge Scholars Publishers. Papers will be posted in the "members only" section of the NAKS website and circulated in advance among participants, who are expected to have read them at the time of the conference.
Contact: Oliver Thorndike.


May 1-2, 2015
John Locke Workshop
University of Western Ontario
Rotman Institute of Philosophy
London, Ontario
Invited speaker: Peter Anstey (Sydney): "Locke on Measurement"
The aim of this workshop is to foster interactions among Locke scholars, encourage the development and creation of new scholarship, and further the pursuit of new ideas regarding Locke's philosophy, its context, and its continuing significance. Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 750 words by Nov. 1, 2014 to johnlockesociety@uwo.ca. Final papers should be no longer than 5000 words. The full program will be made available by Dec. 15, 2014. Further information regarding the workshop, accommodation options, and other practical matters will be available at that time. Submissions on any topic of Locke's philosophy will be considered, but we would especially welcome submissions regarding Locke's natural philosophy and/or philosophy of science, broadly construed.
Website.
Contacts: Benjamin Hill and Jessica Gordon-Roth.


May 1-2, 2015
Chambers Conference: "Kant on Introspection, Self-Consciousness, and Self-Knowledge"
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Lincoln, Nebraska
Confirmed speakers include:
    •  Andrew Brook (Carleton)
    •  Andrew Chignell (Cornell)
    •  Anil Gomes (Oxford)
    •  Béatrice Longuenesse (NYU)
    •  Derk Pereboom (Cornell)
    •  Clinton Tolley (UC San Diego)
Call for papers on the conference topics (listed above) from both historical and contemporary approaches. Submissions should be prepared for blind review. Please include identifying information in a separate document. Reading time for papers is approximately 45 minutes. Submissions exceeding 25 pages are discouraged. Submission deadline: January 15th, 2015. Notification of acceptance by late February. Accepted submissions will receive a $500 stipend. Submissions should be sent to Colin McLear.
Website.
Contact: Colin McLear.


May 5-6, 2015
Brussels Seminar in Modern Philosophy: "Life and Living Beings in Early Modern Philosophy"
Université libre de Bruxelles
Département de Philosophie
Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50
Bruxelles, Belgium
Invited speakers: Delphine Bellis (Radboud U Nijmegen), Mogens Laerke (CNRS-ENS Lyon), Justin Smith (Paris VII-Diderot), Charles Wolfe (Ghent)
Call for papers: The Brussels Seminar in Modern Philosophy aims at fostering interaction among junior and established scholars working in the history of modern philosophy (roughly from late scholasticism up to Kant). The languages of the seminar are English and French. Papers may be submitted on any issue regarding life and living beings in early modern philosophy--for example, how the phenomena of generation, vital organization or organic individuality have posed challenges to philosophy and contribute to the slow scientific revolution concerning the explanation of living beings; or how the ontological specificity of life is to be understood both as zoe and bios. Reading time will be 60 minutes (including discussion). Please send an abstract as attachment (about 500 words), prepared for a multiple blind review, to Arnauld Pelletier by January 15, 2015. The author’s name and affiliation should be included in the body of the e-mail. Notification of acceptance will be given by February 5, 2015. Please note that no financial support can be provided for travel expenses and accommodation. Attendance is free.
Website. Contact: Arnauld Pelletier.


May 5-6, 2015
Conference: Spinoza and Proportion
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen, Scotland
This conference will explore proportion in Spinoza’s philosophy. We are interested in papers that treat any aspect of this topic both within and outside of philosophy; interdisciplinary papers, and papers from people at any career stage (including PhD students) are welcome. Papers should fit broadly into one of three thematic areas:
    •  Geometrical proportion: for example, papers could address the geometrical method, Spinoza’s use of mathematical and geometrical examples, ratio and analogy, or connections between Spinoza’s philosophy and music, drawing, building, or design.
    •  Proportions of individuals: for example, papers could address proportions of motion and rest, proportions of reason and imagination, relational properties, adequacy, parallelism, or part-whole relations.
    •  Proportion in communities: for example, papers could address proportions of power in political systems, proportional representation, distributive justice, equality, similitude and difference in community building, or freedom proportionate to power.
Please send a 300-word abstract to Beth Lord by 1 December 2014. Please indicate your name, institutional affiliation, and whether you are a staff member or PhD student. Participants will be informed by the end of December. Travel funding, accommodation, and conference dinner will be provided for all speakers.
Spinoza and Proportion is the major academic conference of the AHRC Equalities of Wellbeing project. In this project we are investigating how a concept of equality based on geometrical proportion – a concept we take to be present in Spinoza’s philosophy and in architecture – can help us to understand individual and community wellbeing and to develop models for improving the equal distribution of wellbeing through housing design.
Website.
Contact: Beth Lord.


May 7-8, 2015
Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy
University of St Andrews
St Andrews, Scotland
    Invited speakers: Thomas Ahnert (Edinburgh) and Moira Gatens (Sydney)
    The SSEMP brings together established scholars, young researchers and advanced graduate students working in the field of Early Modern Philosophy. The aim is to foster scholarly exchange among the different generations of academics in the UK and to strengthen international collaboration. We welcome abstracts on any topic in pre-Kantian early modern philosophy (broadly defined, ranging from late Renaissance philosophy to the Enlightenment). We particularly encourage proposals that consider early modern philosophy in relation to other related disciplines, such as theology, intellectual history and/or the history of science. Presentations should be in English and approximately 45 minutes in reading length. We make an effort to assure a reasonable gender balance.
    The SSEMP awards a Graduate Student Essay Prize which this year, like last year, is funded by the British Society for the History of Philosophy. The prize includes an invitation to present the essay at the SSEMP and a bursary of £200 towards travel and accommodation. The bursary cannot be used for any other purpose. Submissions to the essay competition should include: (1) Name, affiliation, name and email of supervisor, and personal contact information; (2) the complete essay (max. 6000 words, including notes). Everything should be gathered in a single pdf or word file. Deadline for submissions is 1 February 2015. They should be sent to Mogens Laerke. Those who wish to submit a proposal both as a complete text for the essay competition and as a short abstract for the regular program are free to do so.
    Abstracts for the regular program (approx. 150 words) should be sent to Mogens Laerke as a single word or pdf file, including name and contact information. Graduate students submitting to the regular program should include contact information for one referee (typically the supervisor.) Deadline for submission of abstracts is 1 February 2015. Please note that the SSEMP cannot provide funding for travel or accommodation for speakers.
Website.
Contacts: James Harris and Mogens Laerke.


May 21, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Warren Montag: "Mente, quae imperium in Corpus habet: la notion de commander au corps dans Éthique III, Prop. 2, sc."
Contact: Jack Stetter.


May 22-24, 2015
Conference: Séminaire Descartes et Centre d’Études Cartésiennes
Atelier franco(euro)-américain d’histoire de la philosophie moderne
ENS Ulm
Paris
Times and speakers: TBA
Contact: Denis Kambouchner.


May 27, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:15-4:00  Alexander Douglas (Kings College London): "Affects in Spinoza"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


May 27-29, 2015
Conference: "Scientiae: Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World"
Victoria College, University of Toronto
Toronto, ON, Canada
Invited speakers: Anthony Grafton (Princeton), Peter Dear (Cornell)
Paper, panel, and round-table proposals are invited for Scientiae 2015: the fourth annual international conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early-modern period (1450-1750). The major premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, therefore, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Always, our focus must be on the subject-matter at hand, rather than on the disciplinary performances by which we access it. Although centred around the emergence of modern natural science, Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture.
    Topics may include, but are not limited to:
    •  intellectual geography: networks, intellectual history, and the digital humanities
    •  theological and religious origins and implications of the new sciences
    •  law, learned practices, and the sciences
    •  antiquarianism and the emergence of modern science
    •  the impact of images on the formation of early modern knowledge
    •  genealogies of “reason”, “utility”, and “knowledge”
    •  Humanism and the Scientific Revolution
    •  Paracelsianism, Neoplatonism, and alchemy more generally
    •  interactions between the new sciences, magic and demonology
    •  the history of health and medicine
    •  morality and the character of the natural world
    •  early modern conceptions of, and practices surrounding, intellectual property
    •  poetry, literature, and the natural sciences
    •  the development of novel approaches to cosmology and anthropology
    •  natural history, botany, and art
    •  music: between mathematics, religion, and medicine
    •  global history and nature in the early modern period
    •  information technology, media, and the study of early modernity
    Abstracts for individual papers of 20 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 30 minutes, a list of speakers and chair (with affiliations), a 500-word panel abstract, and individual abstracts from each speaker are required. Newly at Scientiae 2015, we also invite proposals for a limited number of topic-based roundtable sessions. These should feature brief presentations from two or three knowledgeable speakers on a defined but broad issue in early-modern intellectual history, with the intention of opening up multilateral discussion from the floor—the main business of the session.
    All submissions should be made using the online form. The submission deadline is 17 November 2014.
Website.
Contact: James A.T. Lancaster.


May 28-29, 2015
Leuven Kant Conference
University of Leuven
Auditorium Wolfspoort (Huis Bethlehem), Schapenstraat 34
Leuven, Belgium
Confirmed speakers: James Dicenso (Toronto), Pauline Kleingeld (Groningen), Melissa Zinkin (Binghamton)
Call for papers on any aspect of Kant’s philosophy. The conference aims at stimulating fruitful exchanges between established scholars, young researchers, and PhD students. Presentation time will be 25 minutes + 20 minutes for discussion. Abstracts (no more than 500 words, prepared for double-blind review by removing any identification details) should be sent in MSWord as an attachment to leuvenkantconference@kuleuven.be no later than January 5, 2015. The author’s name, paper title, institutional position and affiliation, as well as contact information should be included in the body of the e-mail. Submission deadline: January 15th, 2015. Notification of acceptance by February 1. Please note that the Leuven Kant Conference will not be able to provide funding for travel or accommodation.
Contact: Karin de Boer.


May 28-29, 2015
Conference: Religion and Morality: Hume and His Context
University of Antwerp
Antwerp, Belgium
Invited speakers: Michael B. Gill (Arizona), Gordon Graham (Princeton Theo Sem), Thomas Holden (UC Santa Barbara), Jennifer Marusic (Brandeis/Humboldt)
Call for Papers: we welcome papers dealing with the topic of the conference, Religion and Morality: Hume and his Context. The conference seeks to offer the opportunity to discuss Hume’s understanding of morality and of religion, as well as their relation. We also welcome papers discussing the relation between Hume and his predecessors or contemporaries on issues pertaining to morality and religion. The central focus of the conference will be Hume’s practical critique of religion (i.e. his scattered but recurrent remarks on the detrimental influence of religion on moral character and agency) together with his understanding of religion as a natural phenomenon that may play an important role in fostering human virtues. How does Hume’s moral critique of religion square with his observations that morality and religion are closely interwoven? Hume seems to be convinced that the masses will never be able to live without some form of religion. How does this fit with his defense of a secularized ethics? We also seek to address the views of Hume’s contemporaries that directly challenge or enforce Hume’s understanding of morality and religion. Other possible topics include the context in which Hume develops his account; contemporary accounts that are related to Hume on morality, religion, and, for instance, cognitive science or experimental psychology; the naturalness of religion and its impact on the moral or political life; and true religion and passions in Hume. We also welcome papers dealing with question such as: why and how is Hume’s morality secular? Does Hume’s account of the virtues and vices undermine or discredit religious morality or the teaching of Christianity? Is the autonomy thesis (morality autonomous from religion) in conflict with theism and with religion?
    Abstracts of a maximum of 500 words should be sent no later than January 8, 2015 to Esther Kroeker.
Contact: Esther Kroeker.


June 9-11, 2015
Masterclass on Kant's Philosophy of Nature
University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia
Directed by Eckart Förster (Johns Hopkins/HU-Berlin) and Dalia Nassar (Sydney), this masterclass is organized for a small group of advanced graduate students working on dissertations in German idealism, with special emphasis on the philosophy of nature. The masterclass will be devoted to an intensive discussion of key themes in, and student presentations, the second part of the Critique of Judgment as well as Chapter 2 of the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (“The Metaphysical Foundations of Dynamics”). Participants will be expected to have read the Kant texts before the masterclass.
    Background: In remarks in the Encyclopedia Hegel credits Kant’s “construction” of matter and his notion of “inner purposiveness” with revitalizing the idea of a Naturphilosophie. “With this concept of inner purposiveness,” Hegel writes, “Kant has resuscitated the idea in general and especially the idea of life” (#55A). In turn, Kant’s “construction” of matter in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science has the “merit of having made a beginning toward a concept of matter and of having revived with this attempt the concept of a Naturphilosophie” (#262A). The masterclass will take Hegel’s remarks as its starting point and motto, and pose the following questions:
    •  In what sense were Kant’s dynamic account of matter and notion of inner purposiveness essential for the development of a philosophy of nature?
    •  How did Kant “construct” matter and on what ground did he develop a notion of inner purposiveness?
    •  What did Kant mean by inner purposiveness, and what is its relation to a possible/impossible “construction” of a living body?     •  Did his results in fact furnish the seeds of a philosophy of nature, or did they, rather, offer conflicting and ultimately untenable accounts of the natural world?
To apply for the masterclass, please send a short CV and a brief statement of interest (max. 500 words) before 15 February 2015 to Dalia Nassar. Places are limited. Notification by 15 March 2015.
The masterclass will be followed by a conference on the Philosophy of Nature in the Era of German Idealism (June 15-17, 2015). Eckart Förster will be a keynote speaker.
Website.
Contact: Dalia Nassar.


June 15-17, 2015
Conference: Philosophy of Nature in the Era of German Idealism
University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia
Information forthcoming.
Contact: Dalia Nassar.


June 17, 2015
Colloquium in Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science
University of Ghent
Faculty Library Meeting Room, Rozier 44
Ghent, Belgium
    2:15-4:00  Rina Knoeff (Groningen): "Jerome Gaub (1705-1780), the Management of the Soul and Dutch Eighteenth-Century Culture"
Website.
Contact: Charles Wolfe.


June 22-23, 2015
Conference: Religious Toleration in the Age of Enlightenment (1650-1800): Historical Perspectives on Current Debates
Institute for Culture and Society, Religion & Civil Society Project
Universidad de Navarra
Pamplona, Spain
Enlightenment is not something of the past; many of the prominent ideas that shape current Western culture were generated in the context of the Enlightenment. Moreover, the history of the Enlightenment is being continuously rewritten and constantly employed in contemporary political, intellectual and religious debates. In particular, the relationship between religious toleration and Enlightenment has been the subject of numerous historical accounts that carry a great deal of weight in contemporary discussion. Some portray the Enlightenment as a celebration of the vast diversity of religious beliefs and practices in the world; others, as the discovery of a universal reason that tends to dissolve into uniformity the old religious divisions. There are also those who insist that the rise of toleration was not a matter of philosophical ideas but rather of political and social developments of a more practical nature. Discrepancies are even stronger with respect to the role of religious belief. For some, it was the decline of religious belief that gave birth to the modern idea of tolerance. For others, on the contrary, many of the Enlightenment ideas on toleration have clear religious origins.
    For most scholars, toleration prior to the Enlightenment was no more than a practical measure taken by governments that could not enforce religious conformity. They argue that it was only during the Enlightenment that this limited view of toleration was transformed into freedom of religion understood as an inalienable human right. There are, however, several scholars who insist on the importance of ideas of religious freedom prior to the Enlightenment or consider that, far from being a right of individuals protected by the state, the religious tolerance advocated by Enlightenment thinkers was, in fact, a tool for the state to limit the freedom of churches.
    The Religion and Civil Society Project at the Institute for Culture and Society is organizing this international conference to engage this discussion along two main lines. The first is to trace the many legacies of the Enlightenment present in the prevailing discourses on religion and freedom. The second is to reconsider the existing narratives about the place of the Enlightenment in the history of toleration. This approach aims to examine more critically the underlying presuppositions in recent debates about religious freedom and will contribute to a more rigorous and honest dialogue on this vital subject.
    All scholars in fields related to these topics are cordially invited to participate in our conference. The Organizing Committee is happy to receive proposals from those interested in giving a lecture of 45 minutes, followed by approximately 30 minutes for Q & A. Lecture proposals of no more than one page in length should be submitted, along with a short CV, to Juan Pablo Dominguez by February 15, 2015. A selection of proposals will be made and the authors will be notified by the end of February.
Contacts: Rafael García Pérez and Juan Pablo Dominguez.


June 25, 2015
Séminaire Spinoza à Paris 8
Université Paris 8 (Vincennes Saint-Denis)
Métro Ligne 13, station ‘Saint-Denis Université’
Bâtiment C, salle C005
Saint-Denis, France
Time: 18h à 20H
Intervenant: Blandine Kriegel: "Spinoza, l’autre voie de la modernité"
Contact: Jack Stetter.


July 3-5, 2015
Conference on Leibniz: Scientist and Philosopher
University of Wales, Trinity Saint David, Lampeter Campus
Lampeter, Wales, UK
Invited speakers: Maria Rosa Antognazza (Kings C London), Michael Kempe (Leibniz Research Centre Hanover), Eberhard Knobloch (Technische Universität Berlin)
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) was one of the intellectual giants that helped shape the birth of the modern period. His influence across many branches of learning is inestimable: amongst other things, in mathematics he co-discovered the calculus and created the binary system; in the sciences he constructed a sophisticated dynamics, produced new theories about the natures of space and time, and made important observations about the age and structure of the Earth; and in philosophy he devised the system of pre-established harmony, developed the notion of possible worlds, and instigated the project of theodicy.
    This conference aims to celebrate Leibniz's work by exploring the depth of his philosophical vision in conjunction with his engagement with the sciences of his time. The organizers invite papers that offer new insights into Leibniz's metaphysics and epistemology, and those which explore the nexus between his metaphysics and physics, between his logic and his contributions in other fields such as mathematics, engineering and the nascent life- and earth-sciences. Contributions will be sought under four broad themes, namely:
    •  Metaphysics and epistemology
    •  Mathematics and dynamics
    •  Life sciences and earth sciences
    •  Ethics and theology
Abstracts for papers falling under any of the above themes, broadly construed, are welcomed. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words in length (those that exceed the word limit will not be considered) and prepared for blind review. Please include your name, affiliation and contact details in the body of your email. Abstracts in Microsoft Word or PDF format should be submitted to submissions@leibniz-translations.com by midnight on 28 November 2014. Decisions on submissions will be relayed no later than 21 December 2014. Papers selected for presentation at the conference should be of a length suitable for delivery in 30 minutes, i.e. 3500 - 4000 words (max.). All conference papers will be made available online to delegates prior to the start of the conference; to facilitate this, the deadline for the submission of papers is 31 May 2015.
    Following the conference, the organizers aim to compile and publish a peer-reviewed volume, Leibniz - Scientist, Leibniz - Philosopher, consisting of selected conference papers. When submitting an abstract, please indicate in your email whether you would like your paper considered for publication as part of this volume.
Website.
Contacts: Lloyd Strickland, Erik Vynckier, and Julia Weckend.


July 20-22, 2015
Conference: Themes from Smith and Rousseau
University of Glasgow
Glasgow, Scotland
The conference aims to explore the ideas and shared concerns of Adam Smith and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Proposals for papers are invited on any aspect of Smith, Rousseau, or their shared intellectual interests including (but not limited to) pitié, sympathy, commerce, freedom, nature and science. Given the aim of the conference the organisers are particularly keen to invite papers that deal with both Smith and Rousseau.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Adam Smith (1723-1776) are two of the foremost thinkers of the European Enlightenment, thinkers who made seminal contributions to moral and political philosophy and who shaped some of the key concepts of modern political economy. Both Rousseau and Smith were the product of a shared Calvinist culture of existing intellectual connections between Geneva and Scotland. Though we have no solid evidence that they met in person, we do know that they shared many friends and interlocutors (particularly David Hume who was Smith's closest intellectual associate and who arranged for Rousseau's stay in England in 1766).
    The intellectual influence of Rousseau on Smith has become a matter of increasing scholarly interest. Smith's first published work was a letter to the Edinburgh Review (1756) where he discusses contemporary philosophy, the Encyclopédie and Rousseau's Discours sur l'origine et les fondemens de l'inégalité parmi les hommes (1755). The discussion comes at a key point in Smith's intellectual development as he was engaged in writing the Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) which emerged to great acclaim and established his international reputation. Moreover Rousseau's essay deals with themes, perhaps most particularly self interest, freedom and the division of labour in a commercial society, that would come to dominate Smith's second great work An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). Smith also discusses Rousseau in some of his less well known writings such as the Considerations Concerning the First Formation of Languages (1761) and the essay On the Imitative Arts (1795). Part of what makes the intellectual connection between Rousseau and Smith so interesting is that both Smith and Rousseau were polymaths and Smith seems to both absorb some elements of Rousseau's views while simultaneously reacting against others. This complex blend of influence and reaction renders Smith and Rousseau a subject ripe for further exploration.
    More recently scholars have begun to explore the influence of Rousseau on Smith's thought. Ryan Hanley, Dennis C. Rasmussen and Charles Griswold have all produced recent work on the connection between Smith and Rousseau. The aim of this joint meeting of the International Adam Smith Society and the Rousseau Association is to foster further work on the intellectual connections between these two great thinkers. By bringing together members of both societies we hope to promote the discussion of this fascinating intellectual relationship in a workshop setting. Further details can be found on the websites of the two societies.
    Please submit a title and abstract to Craig Smith, University of Glasgow, no later than 1 January 2015.


July 20-24, 2015
International Hume Society Conference
Stockholm University
Stockholm, Sweden
We invite papers in all areas of Hume studies but especially welcome submissions related to the conference themes: Hume's Life and Biography, Hume's Fictions and Fictionalism, and Character and Self in Hume's Moral Philosophy. Papers should be no more than thirty minutes reading length (4000 words) and should be submitted with an Abstract (200 words). All self-references should be deleted for anonymous review. Papers and abstracts must be submitted in English. Papers should not have been published by the date of the conference. Authors may submit their papers to the Hume Society Conference Manager website as either MS Word documents or in rich text format (RTF). Hume Society Young Scholar Awards are given to qualifying graduate students whose papers are accepted through the anonymous review process. Deadline for Submissions: November 1, 2014. Please email web@humesociety.org for questions regarding paper submissions.
Website.
Contact: Rico Vitz.


September 21-25, 2015
International Kant Society Congress: Nature and Freedom
University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria
The 12th International Kant Congress in Vienna is dedicated to the antagonism of nature and freedom, which is as much an issue of great relevance in contemporary discussions as it was during the Enlightenment period. The question of to what extent human actions are guided by nature or free will seems even less clear in modern times than it was in the 18th century. Kant’s writings offer significant potential for contemporary interdisciplinary discussions, which connect philosophy with natural sciences, medicine, neurology and psychology, law and social sciences. While the Kant Congress 2015 will mainly focus on these issues, there will be also three key topics related to Vienna: Kant and the Vienna Circle, Kant and phenomenology and Kant and the poets. Furthermore, there will be various additional sections in order to account for the wide range of topics in Kant’s philosophy. The official languages of the congress are German, English and French. The schedule includes:
Monday, Sept. 21
    9:00  Opening
    10:00  Michael Wolff (Bielefeld): "Freiheit und Natur"
    11:40  Michael Friedman (Stanford): "The Science of Nature and the Demands of Freedom: Denying Knowledge to Make Room for Belief"
Tuesday, Sept. 22
    9:00  Steven Crowell (Rice): "Kant and the Phenomenology of Life"
    10:20  Dominique Pradelle (Paris): "Husserls Kritik an Kants praktischer Philosophie"
    12:00  Patricia Kitcher (Columbia): "Freedom in Thought and Action"
Wednesday, Sept. 23
    9:00  Pauline Kleingeld (Groningen): "Freedom and the Formula of Universal Law"
    10:20  Guido Almeida (Rio de Janeiro): "Kant’s Conception of Freedom"
    12:00  Rudolf Langthaler (Vienna): "'...um zum Glauben Platz zu bekommen': Verschiedene Gestalten des kantischen 'Vernunftglaubens'"
Thursday, Sept. 24
    9:00  Alexej Krouglov (Moscow): "Kants Lehre von Raum und Zeit und die Möglichkeit einer Freiheit in der russischen Poesie"
    10:20  Frederic Beiser (Syracuse): "Kant and the Poets"
    12:00  Hannah Ginsborg (UC Berkeley): "Kant's 'Young Poet' and the Normativity of Aesthetic Judgment"
Friday, Sept. 25
    9:00  Massimo Ferrari (Turin): "Natur versus Freiheit: Zum Kant-Verständnis des Wiener Kreises"
    10:20  Michela Massimi (Edinburgh): "Prescribing Laws to Nature"
    12:00  Tobias Rosefeldt (Humboldt, Berlin): "Freedom and Transcendental Idealism"
Sections:
    •  Kant's Precritical Philosophy
    •  Metaphysics
    •  Epistemology and Logics
    •  History of Science and Nature
    •  Teleology
    •  Ethics and Moral Philosophy
    •  Philosophy of Law and Justice
    •  Philosophy of Politics, History and Culture
    •  Anthropology and Psychology
    •  Religion and Theology
    •  Aesthetics
    •  Kant and the Precritical Rationalism and Empiricism
    •  Kant and his Poets
    •  Kant and German Idealism
    •  Kant and the Vienna Circle
    •  Kant and Phenomenology
    •  Kant and Neo-Kantianism
    •  Kant and Eastern Europe
    •  Kant and the Traditional Asian Philosophy
    •  Kant in Schools
    •  Kant in the Present Time
To submit a paper, go to the conference website for submissions. Deadline for submissions is October 20, 2014. Please submit a full paper, consisting of max. 8 pages (= 20.000 characters, spaces included) as well as an abstract consisting of ½ page (= 1.000 characters, spaces included) and identify the section your paper refers to clearly. Presentations should not exceed 25 minutes. Papers must be suitable for anonymous review. Please refrain from making references to your own work or anything obvious that could reveal your identity. Authors will be notified of the review outcome not later than March 1, 2015. Participation in the congress is also possible without a paper.
Website.
Contacts: Violetta Waibel and Sophie Gerber.


October 23-25, 2015
Leibniz Society of North America Conference
Ohio State University
Columbus, OH
CFP: papers on any aspect of Leibniz’s philosophy will be considered and should have a reading time of approximately 45 minutes. Submissions should take the form of abstracts of 1,000 words or less and should be submitted, prepared for blind review, to lsna2015@osu.edu in either Microsoft Word or PDF format. The deadline for the receipt of submissions is February 15th, 2015. Authors will be notified by April 1st, 2015 of the program committee’s decision.
Website.
Contact: Julia Jorati.


January 6-9, 2016
APA Eastern Division Meeting
Washington Marriott Wardman Park
2660 Woodley Road NW
Washington, DC
Website.
Program submission deadline: February 15, 2015


January 11-14, 2016
International Berkeley Conference
Hebrew University
Jerusalem, Israel
George Berkeley (1685-1753) contributed to a wide range of academic disciplines; from philosophy and metaphysics to mathematics and empirical psychology; from theology to political economy and monetary policy. We are now inviting distinguished scholars to give a diversified account of Berkeley's works with respect to his broad range of interest. Anyone interested in participating in the conference should send an abstract before 28 February 2015 to either:
Meir Buzgalo or Bertil Belfrage.


March 2-5, 2016
APA Central Division Meeting
Palmer House
17 East Monroe Street
Chicago, IL
Website.
Program submission deadline: June 1, 2015


March 21-23, 2016
Conference: Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, Religion and Science
University of Groningen
Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies, Oude Boteringestraat 38, 9712 GK
Groningen, The Netherlands
During the early modern period (c. 1600-1800) women were involved in many debates that tangled together metaphysics, religion and science. The women included figures such as Margaret Cavendish, Emilie Du Châtelet, Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia, and Damaris Cudworth Masham. The debates surrounded issues such as atomism, determinism, motion, mind-body causation, mechanism, space, and natural laws. The conference program will consist of invited speakers and speakers drawn from an open call for papers. Invited speakers include:
    •  Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth)
    •  Jacqueline Broad (Monash)
    •  Susan James (Birkbeck)
    •  Andrew Janiak (Duke)
    •  Karen Detlefsen (Pennsylvania)
    •  David Cunning (Iowa)
    •  Deborah Boyle (Charleston)
    •  Tom Stoneham (York)
Call for Papers: Submissions are invited from any discipline, and from researchers of all levels (including PhD students). Submissions are welcome on any aspect of the conference theme. To submit for the conference, please email an abstract (maximum 800 words) to the conference organiser, Emily Thomas. The abstract should be anonymised for blind review, and the email should contain the author’s details (name, affiliation, contact details). The deadline for abstract submission is 20th October 2015.
Website.
Contact: Emily Thomas.


March 30-April 3, 2016
APA Pacific Division Meeting
The Westin St. Francis
335 Powell Street
San Francisco, CA
Website.
Program submission deadline: September 1, 2015


August 7-9, 2016
Kant Multilateral Colloquium
Hofstra University
Hempstead, NY
The theme of the meeting is: Kant on Violence, Revolution, and Progress: Historical, Political, and Metaphysical Themes. “Revolution” and “progress” are interpreted broadly, in order to include not only their historical or political meaning, but also Kant’s “Copernican Revolution” in metaphysics, science, aesthetics, religion, etc. The Multilateral Colloquium is an annual conference involving approximately forty participants from Brazil, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Germany. This is the first time the meeting will be hosted in a North American country, and in particular the first time it will be hosted in the USA. We welcome this development as part of the North American Kant Society’s efforts to build stronger relations with other Kant societies and scholars around the world. Participants from other countries may choose to present their work in their native language, provided an English version is available and circulated in advance. Each participating country will determine its own selection process.
    Instructions for US Participants: We welcome contributions from any aspect of Kantian scholarship, including discussions of Kant’s immediate predecessors and successors. The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2016. Notices of acceptance will be issued by April 15th. Please send all papers electronically to Robert Louden. Submissions should be prepared for blind review and be limited to 4000 words, including footnotes and references (longer submissions will not be considered). Please prepare your file in PDF format, include an abstract of a maximum of 250 words, and a word count at the end of the paper. Contact information should be sent in a separate Word file. When pertinent, please indicate whether you are a graduate student in the body of the text. The best graduate student paper will receive a $200 stipend from NAKS. Women, minorities, and graduate students are encouraged to submit their work. Presentations cannot exceed 30-35 minutes, followed by 15-20 minutes of discussion. We encourage authors not to read their texts. All accepted papers will be avaliable in the members only section of the NAKS website, and participants in the conference are expected to read them in advance. Papers already presented at other NAKS study groups or meetings may not be submitted. Presenters must be members of NAKS in good standing.
Website.
Contacts: Robert Louden and Terry Godlove.


January 4-7, 2017
APA Eastern Division Meeting
Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
202 East Pratt Street
Baltimore, MD
Website.
Program submission deadline: February 15, 2016